Common Name(s): Caribbean Heart Pine

Botanical Name: Pius caribaea

Woodworking Qualities: Pine is a relatively simple wood to work. It is not generally difficult to saw, and sands well. Nails and glue both hold well in pine.

Janka Rating: Caribbean Heart Pine has a Janka rating of 1280, only a small fraction less than Northern Red Oak. Other species of Pine are notorious for lower Janka ratings, perhaps in part due to the fact that pine trees are actually classified as softwood. This does not, however, steal away from the durability of the wood, only the direct hardness.

Species Characteristics: Pine of any species is not typically difficult to dry, as some woods can be. Some pine species are somewhat vulnerable to decay, but they accept preservatives quite well.

Appearance: Sapwood of pine is usually a yellow or tan white color, while the heartwood is darker orange-yellow to yellow-brown. Pine is associated very much with "lighter" colored floors, since darker colors have become more popular.

Color Change: This species begins as a golden brown to red brown floor that gains more red coloration as it is exposed.

Uses: Pine is most commonly used as lumber, although it has a certain amount of popularity as a flooring option. It is also used very much as paper, plywood, and for more festive uses such as Christmas trees.

Caribbean Heart Pine Origin:

Caribbean Heart Pine naturally grows in the tropical areas of Cuba, Honduras, the Bahamas, Guatemala, and Nicaragua, but has been introduced into various areas around the world, including Australia, Sri Lanka, and South Africa.

Common Name(s): Caribbean Heart Pine

Botanical Name: Pius caribaea

Woodworking Qualities: Pine is a relatively simple wood to work. It is not generally difficult to saw, and sands well. Nails and glue both hold well in pine.

Janka Rating: Caribbean Heart Pine has a Janka rating of 1280, only a small fraction less than Northern Red Oak. Other species of Pine are notorious for lower Janka ratings, perhaps in part due to the fact that pine trees are actually classified as softwood. This does not, however, steal away from the durability of the wood, only the direct hardness.

Species Characteristics: Pine of any species is not typically difficult to dry, as some woods can be. Some pine species are somewhat vulnerable to decay, but they accept preservatives quite well.

Appearance: Sapwood of pine is usually a yellow or tan white color, while the heartwood is darker orange-yellow to yellow-brown. Pine is associated very much with "lighter" colored floors, since darker colors have become more popular.

Color Change: This species begins as a golden brown to red brown floor that gains more red coloration as it is exposed.

Uses: Pine is most commonly used as lumber, although it has a certain amount of popularity as a flooring option. It is also used very much as paper, plywood, and for more festive uses such as Christmas trees.